CeBIT Showcases Japanese Innovation in Germany

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CeBIT, Europe’s biggest digital economy conferences, has begun today in the German city of Hannover. And among a packed schedule, which comprises dozens of the industry’s sectors, organizers are hoping to showcase Japanese companies and platforms that are changing the world.

The event, which was inaugurated in 1970 and is held each year at Hannover’s Messe (Trade Fair), welcomes around 334,000 people, and features exhibits, discussions and speeches on topics including Big Data, the Internet of things (IoT), banking solutions and virtual and augmented reality.

But by partnering with Japanese technology companies, this year’s CeBIT has an even more futuristic look. In particular robots, AI and machine learning are set to take center stage. And, as event organizers describe, the Asian country people is forging ahead in tech’s brave new world.

“The relationship between man and machine seems to have progressed much further in Japan than anywhere else,” reads a CeBIT statement. “Although only around 127 million people live there, it boasts the third largest economy in the world. It also takes third place when it comes to average annual income per household – its $86,000 putting it behind only the USA and Switzerland.”

A close relationship between Japan and Germany has flourished in recent years: the former currently exports just under €1.3bn ($1.38bn) in IT products to the European economic powerhouse each year.

An industry in which the two countries dominate is automaking. German manufacturers have been steadfast in their pursuit of car technology including driverless software, while Japanese brands Nissan, Toyota and Honda will all present their latest technology in the race to put smart cars on roads worldwide.

Car industry insiders and enthusiasts should visit the CeBIT Japan Summit on March 20, which features talks and presentations on Japan’s latest technology and its economic ties globally. Elsewhere leading lights from the business, tech and political worlds will speak, at what promises to be a highlight of the tech year.